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Entries for the 'Crossbow Critique' Category

13

Heading into the field on the next hunting trip is a jubilation that each of us that pursues wild things is very familiar with. Visions of trophy critters and epic deeds of great cunning and courage dominate our thoughts as we head for our destinations, fired up with all of the anticipation that can only be meted out by the thrill of a hunt in wilderness, wherever that wilderness might be. In recent years, however, one more facet of added excitement for this aging writer has been included in my personal recipe for adventure. With the onset of each new hunt, I have another make and model of crossbow to put through its paces and evaluate in the field. The objective of that task is to become familiar enough with the bow so that I have a thorough understanding of it and will then be able to write a review, answer specific questions about it and share my personal thoughts about that particular bow with our readers when they call to ask my opinion.

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02

With ever more states in the USA encouraging the use of the crossbow for hunting, an enormous market has opened up.Crossbow sales have increased on an unprecedented scale, so much so that crossbowyers can scarcely keep up with demand.Predictably, in a society driven by free market forces, and with material and sourcing cost increasing, the retail price of hunting crossbows has increased apace; for some of us, perhaps prohibitively so.

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Posted in: Crossbow Critique
12

A good strong knife may cut a stray arrow out of a tree, trim the thread on the serving in the field, skin or gralloch (opening the stomach cavity using ones fingers to prevent puncture to the intestines) the quarry. Folding knives have their own advantage. Their use is more discreet, sparing on the machismo. Worn in a secure belt-pouch, they are generally perceived as much safer than their rigid cousins when use aboard floating craft, in vehicles on rough terrain or on horseback. However, they can also have mechanisms which can fail, blades which close on fingers, and may be too slow to deploy when needed urgently. In such circumstance, it pays to get the best.

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14

The GT Flex crossbow is made by U.S. Crossbowyer TenPoint, but they label it “SixPoint” a logo type reserved for bows marketed within the lower end of their price range. Interesting as that may seem, anyone who reads my reviews will know that I recognize and applaud high quality; what is less well known is that I warn companies to take care over what they send me. If they want a good review it had better be a good product. And there, on my doorstep, I see an inexpensive bow from a company famed as the marketer of the Cadillac of crossbows. Inexpensive is a relative term, but the GT Flex is around a third of the price of some.

The box felt light. In it was a crossbow in two main parts, a recurve prod and a mainframe with stock attached, and some bits and pieces...

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Posted in: Crossbow Critique
04

One cold Winter’s afternoon a few years ago, I was over at Bow-Plus, the pro-shop that imports crossbows to Britain for my reviews, talking over a coffee with owner Dave Horder about crossbow that might be interesting to review, and he told me about the reverse-draw concept bow mad by Jim Kempf, whom he had met at one of the international shows. Essentially, the reverse-draw concept involved mounting the prod of what was a compound crossbow with the string on the target side of the riser, implying that the string was, as it were, pushed towards the riser instead of pulled away from it as one does when drawing a conventional bow. Dave reported that, on the prototype, the standard of engineering was high, the design radical and the performance seemed good. He also advised that Jim Kempf was a very pleasant man and I should get in touch with him.

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Posted in: Crossbow Critique
 
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